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.257 Roberts Loads
Discussion regarding the reloading of ammunition and tuning of loads for accuracy
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happycamper
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Joined: Dec 14, 2006
Posts: 42

PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 4:52 pm    Post subject: Re: .257 Roberts Loads Reply with quote

HI
I got a 257 roberts rifle barrel for sale
it was a ruger 25-06 barrel turned down retreaded and rechambred to 257 roberts to fit the savage model 110 series rrifles
asking 85.00 free shiping

apple03 @ localnet.com
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bradking1
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Joined: Mar 03, 2005
Posts: 53

PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2008 4:50 pm    Post subject: Re: .257 Roberts Loads Reply with quote

I have a No1 in the Bob and I shoot a 117 Sierra SPBT, 47.0 H414, WW cases, CCI250 primers. This load is very fast but is over Hodgdon's manual by 4 grs. I have no pressure signs and it shoots 1/2 MOA. Just work loads up carefully...if you have an old mauser actioned rifle then you want to be on the conservative side but with our modern actions you should have no problem squeezing out all the performance you can get with the ol' Roberts.
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copychef
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:42 pm    Post subject: Re: .257 Roberts Loads Reply with quote

Anvilhead:

Guns are like gals - they all like to think they're "special," especially when it comes to pet loads. But after years of experimentation, here's what works great in my .257 Roberts Ruger M77 and my hunting partner's .257 Roberts Winchester Featherweight M7:

IMR 4350 - 43.5 grains (how's THAT for easy to remember?)
Nosler Partition - 100 grain

That load kills muleys with one shot on a regular basis up here in Idaho (providing you don't try for a Texas heart shot). You'll also find it listed in the Holy Book of Nosler as the "most accurate" with 4350.

I would avoid the 117 grain bullets (such as Remington packs in their factory loads) because they are neither as efficient or accurate in my experience as the 100 grains.

I also have had great success using the same powder charge with 75 grain Hornady V-Max for whistle pigs and rock chucks.

My 12-year-old is planning to shoot his first deer with it this year, and the recoil doesn't phase him much at all.

I am looking for a nice Winchester Featherweight in this caliber - any for sale out there?

Best of Luck!
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fnuser
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Location: S.W. Missouri, U.S.A.

PostPosted: Mon Jul 06, 2009 3:00 pm    Post subject: Re: .257 Roberts Loads Reply with quote

Anne C you might try increasing powder weight half a grain and make up about 5 of each to see if accuracy increases as pressure builds this is often the case as different nodes are found.

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alamoredfish
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Joined: Sep 22, 2009
Posts: 2
Location: Chillicothe, Ohio/San Antonio, Tx.

PostPosted: Mon Sep 21, 2009 8:02 pm    Post subject: Re: .257 Roberts Loads Reply with quote

Ahhh..... how sweet they are!

Mr. N. had more than a vision with the emergence of this 'wildcat' round to them, back then!

Greetings, I'm Jeff behind this key board.

So many powders, bullets, primers, and cases to get miss-guided on. I seen one comment that what works in one gun doesn't always work in another gun. SOOOOO true!!

I've been pushing powder for over 44 years! Taught rifle marksmanship in the Army and have been fortunate to live and hunt in Colorado from the plains to the mountains.

If you want the best and quickest results to make your weapon the 'happeningest thing' in your life; KEEP IT SIMPLE!

I have three .257's; ranging from my old Mauser to my wife's Rem. Classic, to my first building of my custom 'shooter.'

Whether shooting Terry's Classic to the Douglas Premium Barrel on my custom........ you need to experiment a little bit!

I shoot IMR 4350 in about 6 of the different calibers I reload (22-250 to 7 Rem Mag). Yes, it's not one of your "magnum' rated powders like 4831's... etc. I just don't get off on getting my lights momentarily turned off every time I'd pull the trigger.

A longer burn off is much more enjoyable than setting off a nuclear explosion, to me. At 55 y.o. my body and bones react to a lot of things more subtly than they use to.

The tolerance in the bore of your rifle maybe rated in only 1000'ths of a decimal, but considering the density of your copper jacket having to cut into the rifling and get the weight of your various bullets sent traveling down your barrel from the swelling gases behind it, it will, and does create it's own set of internal 'microscopic' vibrations through the steel walls in the barrel.

To me, I'd take any suggest "MAX" load and back off about 10% to start. If it's an older gun, I'd back off a bit more. How much has the barrel actually been shot? Was the rifling on the rifle actually put through a "break-in" period when new? Yep; just like breaking in the block on a new engine. polishing is important, to create the precision seating needed to reach top performance and reliability. Reliability??? A nice thought when pulling the trigger on a trophy of a lifetime!

My "all time" top performer and accuracy repeater in "our 3" .257's is as follows:

Using brass large rifle primers, not-magnum (Winchester), 43 gr. IMR 4350, and for deer it's definitely Hornady's 117gr. Inter-lock, velocity about 2850 fps; shooting the "shoulder crease" IN FRONT of the shoulder! They just drop! It's exciting to find your bullet, usually just under the deer's hide on the back side. You can see how it expanded and released all of it's stored up energy, in-side of the game, instead of out in the brush.

I've lost, chased, and spent many 'dark' hours looking for game I knew I had made a good hit on, until this little Hornady came into my life.

Yes, this is what I see as my remedy for success. There are lots of great bullets out there with different uses. Read up a bit about sectional densities and energy dispersion rates. Until I found this Hornady, EVERY shot I made was a 'blow through" and the animal took off!

The idea of reloading is to create and control the energy you can produce in mixing your selected bullet and powder 's gases to deliver a time release formula of "Kick-A__" to your desired target. Where do you want your time release formula released? Inside your target or after it has 'blown'through' and went cutting off through the brush? None of my deer have ever been takin' with a falling tree limb....

My last "5" south Texas White tails have fallen to this round and traveled no more than maybe, ten feet! With the 'front' shoulder entry shot. It's made a more confident and serious believer out of my wife!!

I'm going to close with just a bit more info. I love reloading as a way of self expression and self generated accomplishment as you see what you can achieve and produce with a bit of serious testing.

I start at about 10% below max, load 3 shells with that load, drop 1/2 grain and load 3 more, drop another half grain and load 3 more. Then load 3 1/2 grain above your starting point, then 3 more 1/2 grain above that one.

YOU NEED TO KEEP TRACK OF THESE CAREFULLY! I color code my cases with markers to identify the different powder levels. I use a piece of white typing paper and orange florescent paint. I paint 4 vertical rows of three orange dots across this paper. Making the dots about the size of a quarter. This is what you use as your recording target.

Barrel temp is important as well as using a good rest and being serious to make each shot count as if it was your last!! Keep your action open between shots for heat to escape as you work between rounds. Then monitor your barrel as to begin getting pretty warm. You may need to shoot these rounds over a period of time in order to shoot as cool of a barrel as possible! Most game is killed out of a cold barrel. Remember, as a barrel warms, steel expands, your internal tolerance increases and your bullet moves (easier) differently down the barrel. There goes your precision!

If you don't already, try this type of trigger pull, it's what I taught in the military. Calmy breath in and out three times, slowly, deeply as you are resting your cross hairs on your selected target; STOP half way on expelling your third breath and ease back on your trigger pull; using only the first tip section of your finger.... A proper trigger pull should surprise you when it goes off!

The main idea isn't to hit the orange dot with each shot!!!! The secret is to evaluate each of the "3" shot groups and see which one is the tightest! This is a sign of which load "YOUR" barrel likes the most!!

Gee... it's late and I need to get some sleep! Moving this weekend to our family farm in souther Ohio. Been beating this Texas brush for 20 years!! Time to live in a cool place!!

Feel free to buzz me if I can ever help or comment on any of your adventurous needs......

Be safe, shoot straight, and I'll catch at the bench next time!!

Jeff Snyder



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alamoredfish
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Joined: Sep 22, 2009
Posts: 2
Location: Chillicothe, Ohio/San Antonio, Tx.

PostPosted: Mon Sep 21, 2009 8:05 pm    Post subject: Re: .257 Roberts Loads Reply with quote

Ahhh..... how sweet they are!

Mr. N. had more than a vision with the emergence of this 'wildcat' round to them, back then!

Greetings, I'm Jeff behind this key board.

So many powders, bullets, primers, and cases to get miss-guided on. I seen one comment that what works in one gun doesn't always work in another gun. SOOOOO true!!

I've been pushing powder for over 44 years! Taught rifle marksmanship in the Army and have been fortunate to live and hunt in Colorado from the plains to the mountains.

If you want the best and quickest results to make your weapon the 'happeningest thing' in your life; KEEP IT SIMPLE!

I have three .257's; ranging from my old Mauser to my wife's Rem. Classic, to my first building of my custom 'shooter.'

Whether shooting Terry's Classic to the Douglas Premium Barrel on my custom........ you need to experiment a little bit!

I shoot IMR 4350 in about 6 of the different calibers I reload (22-250 to 7 Rem Mag). Yes, it's not one of your "magnum' rated powders like 4831's... etc. I just don't get off on getting my lights momentarily turned off every time I'd pull the trigger.

A longer burn off is much more enjoyable than setting off a nuclear explosion, to me. At 55 y.o. my body and bones react to a lot of things more subtly than they use to.

The tolerance in the bore of your rifle maybe rated in only 1000'ths of a decimal, but considering the density of your copper jacket having to cut into the rifling and get the weight of your various bullets sent traveling down your barrel from the swelling gases behind it, it will, and does create it's own set of internal 'microscopic' vibrations through the steel walls in the barrel.

To me, I'd take any suggest "MAX" load and back off about 10% to start. If it's an older gun, I'd back off a bit more. How much has the barrel actually been shot? Was the rifling on the rifle actually put through a "break-in" period when new? Yep; just like breaking in the block on a new engine. polishing is important, to create the precision seating needed to reach top performance and reliability. Reliability??? A nice thought when pulling the trigger on a trophy of a lifetime!

My "all time" top performer and accuracy repeater in "our 3" .257's is as follows:

Using brass large rifle primers, not-magnum (Winchester), 43 gr. IMR 4350, and for deer it's definitely Hornady's 117gr. Inter-lock, velocity about 2850 fps; shooting the "shoulder crease" IN FRONT of the shoulder! They just drop! It's exciting to find your bullet, usually just under the deer's hide on the back side. You can see how it expanded and released all of it's stored up energy, in-side of the game, instead of out in the brush.

I've lost, chased, and spent many 'dark' hours looking for game I knew I had made a good hit on, until this little Hornady came into my life.

Yes, this is what I see as my remedy for success. There are lots of great bullets out there with different uses. Read up a bit about sectional densities and energy dispersion rates. Until I found this Hornady, EVERY shot I made was a 'blow through" and the animal took off!

The idea of reloading is to create and control the energy you can produce in mixing your selected bullet and powder 's gases to deliver a time release formula of "Kick-A__" to your desired target. Where do you want your time release formula released? Inside your target or after it has 'blown'through' and went cutting off through the brush? None of my deer have ever been takin' with a falling tree limb....

My last "5" south Texas White tails have fallen to this round and traveled no more than maybe, ten feet! With the 'front' shoulder entry shot. It's made a more confident and serious believer out of my wife!!

I'm going to close with just a bit more info. I love reloading as a way of self expression and self generated accomplishment as you see what you can achieve and produce with a bit of serious testing.

I start at about 10% below max, load 3 shells with that load, drop 1/2 grain and load 3 more, drop another half grain and load 3 more. Then load 3 1/2 grain above your starting point, then 3 more 1/2 grain above that one.

YOU NEED TO KEEP TRACK OF THESE CAREFULLY! I color code my cases with markers to identify the different powder levels. I use a piece of white typing paper and orange florescent paint. I paint 4 vertical rows of three orange dots across this paper. Making the dots about the size of a quarter. This is what you use as your recording target.

Barrel temp is important as well as using a good rest and being serious to make each shot count as if it was your last!! Keep your action open between shots for heat to escape as you work between rounds. Then monitor your barrel as to begin getting pretty warm. You may need to shoot these rounds over a period of time in order to shoot as cool of a barrel as possible! Most game is killed out of a cold barrel. Remember, as a barrel warms, steel expands, your internal tolerance increases and your bullet moves (easier) differently down the barrel. There goes your precision!

If you don't already, try this type of trigger pull, it's what I taught in the military. Calmy breath in and out three times, slowly, deeply as you are resting your cross hairs on your selected target; STOP half way on expelling your third breath and ease back on your trigger pull; using only the first tip section of your finger.... A proper trigger pull should surprise you when it goes off!

The main idea isn't to hit the orange dot with each shot!!!! The secret is to evaluate each of the "3" shot groups and see which one is the tightest! This is a sign of which load "YOUR" barrel likes the most!!

Gee... it's late and I need to get some sleep! Moving this weekend to our family farm in souther Ohio. Been beating this Texas brush for 20 years!! Time to live in a cool place!!

Feel free to buzz me if I can ever help or comment on any of your adventurous needs......

Be safe, shoot straight, and I'll catch at the bench next time!!

Jeff Snyder



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