HuntingNut
HuntingNut
   Login or Register
HomeCommunity ForumsPhoto AlbumsRegister
     
 

User Info

Welcome Anonymous


Membership:
Latest: RM1994
New Today: 0
New Yesterday: 2
Overall: 12427

People Online:
Members: 0
Visitors: 78
BOT: 4
Total: 82
Who Is Where:
 Visitors:
01: Forums
02: Forums
03: Forums
04: News
05: Forums
06: Forums
07: Forums
08: Home
09: Forums
10: Photo Albums
11: News
12: Forums
13: Forums
14: Forums
15: Forums
16: Forums
17: Forums
18: Forums
19: Forums
20: Forums
21: Forums
22: Forums
23: Forums
24: Forums
25: Forums
26: Forums
27: Forums
28: Forums
29: Forums
30: Forums
31: Forums
32: Forums
33: Forums
34: News
35: Photo Albums
36: Forums
37: Forums
38: Forums
39: Photo Albums
40: Forums
41: Forums
42: Photo Albums
43: Forums
44: Forums
45: Forums
46: Forums
47: Forums
48: Forums
49: Forums
50: Forums
51: Photo Albums
52: Forums
53: Forums
54: Forums
55: Forums
56: Forums
57: Forums
58: Forums
59: Forums
60: Forums
61: Forums
62: Forums
63: Forums
64: Forums
65: Photo Albums
66: Forums
67: Forums
68: Forums
69: Forums
70: Home
71: Forums
72: Forums
73: Forums
74: Forums
75: Forums
76: Forums
77: Forums
78: Forums
  BOT:
01: Forums
02: Forums
03: Forums
04: News

Staff Online:

No staff members are online!
 

Coppermine Stats
Photo Albums
 Albums: 300
 Pictures: 2357
  · Views: 276256
  · Votes: 1295
  · Comments: 86
 

Support our Advertisers

So where are the Antler Fossils?
Discussion that doesnt fit other Topics
Post new topic   Reply to topic   Printer Friendly Page    Forum Index » General

View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
DallanC
Site Admin
Site Admin


Joined: Jan 18, 2005
Posts: 3109
Location: Utah

PostPosted: Tue Dec 27, 2005 6:42 pm    Post subject: So where are the Antler Fossils? Reply with quote

Lets assume before modern day man came along a mature deer or elk grew to be roughly 6 years old before dying. That means roughly 5 sets of antlers to be grown and shed over its lifetime. With the number of deer like animals over millions of years, you would think there would be a tremendous amount of antlers that could fossilize. So why dont we find more of those than we do? I've done some searching and the only fossilized antlers I've been able to find are those of Reindeer. This makes me think either:

A) Antlers decompose quicker than normal bone so there are fewer to actually fossilize

B) Antlered animals were much more rare than other types of animals so there are fewer antlers dropped to later fossilize.


Thoughts? (yes I am bored at work)


-DallanC
Back to top
View user's profile Photo Gallery
GroovyJack
Member
Member


Joined: May 21, 2005
Posts: 577
Location: Bama

PostPosted: Tue Dec 27, 2005 7:42 pm    Post subject: Re: So where are the Antler Fossils? Reply with quote

Yes we can see you are bored at work .. Actually I have never given it any thought ... I have seen a set of antlers on an otherwise nice elk mount , that someone left out side for about six months , for whatever stoopid reason , and the antlers were very brittle , on the other hand , I have seen , and you as well , many antlers left hanging out at clubhouses and the like , that were in good shape .. So I dunno ..
Jack

_________________
My Goal In Life Is To Be As Good Of A Person As My Dog Already Thinks I Am
Back to top
View user's profile
515034s10ring
Super Member
Super Member


Joined: Sep 08, 2005
Posts: 1153
Location: Working my way back up and around

PostPosted: Tue Dec 27, 2005 8:18 pm    Post subject: Re: So where are the Antler Fossils? Reply with quote

Aint you got's anything better to do wit yer time???? Laughing


Ok, by doing some tough, ear smoking thinkin, i came up with something.....

Decompisition would be the number one thing because depending on time (of year and temperature), the nourishment from the 'somewhat' still alive antler will provide food for whatever insect burrows into the antler for the marrow. When bone rapidly looses blood supply, and or marrow (through a natural or even a non preservation way) bone density is greatly reduced and henceforth deteriorates the antler to an utmost form of powder.

Plus, carnivorous animals chew the palatable antler matter to sharpen teeth, which is a natural instinct.


Just thoughts off the top of my head Cool

_________________
Why no......I'm really not an outdoorsmsn at all. But i did stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night!
Back to top
View user's profile
mikekuzara
Member
Member


Joined: Sep 13, 2005
Posts: 147
Location: Farson, Wyoming

PostPosted: Tue Dec 27, 2005 10:47 pm    Post subject: Re: So where are the Antler Fossils? Reply with quote

Most sheds you find won't be more than a year or two old. The mice and such chew them up pretty quick. The reason ones above a club house etc. seem to last longer is that they do not sit on the damp ground completely covered in snow, on ground with all the microbes, fungi, etc.

Here in wyoming if you find a shed that has been on the ground for any length of time, it is usually chewed, brittle, and cracked and we live in a desert (6 to 10 inches of rainfall a year).

_________________
Build a fire for a man and he is warm for a day.

Set a man on fire and he is warm the rest of his life.
Back to top
View user's profile Photo Gallery
beezer
Member
Member


Joined: Aug 22, 2005
Posts: 75

PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2005 4:23 am    Post subject: Re: So where are the Antler Fossils? Reply with quote

Deer eat their shed antlers to replace calcium to help with regrowth next season. Ol so there are a number of rodents and insects which benefit from the added calcium.
Back to top
View user's profile Yahoo Messenger
yotebuster
Member
Member


Joined: Oct 16, 2005
Posts: 216
Location: Georgia

PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2005 5:00 am    Post subject: Re: So where are the Antler Fossils? Reply with quote

Dallan, I dive for fossilized shark teeth from the megladon shark that swam in the ocean millions of years. And I have found fossilized deer antlers, along with many other critters, while doing so. Mastadon teeth, tusks, whale vertabrae, ribs, etc. I have even found parts of deer antlers while walking the beach in northeast Florida.
In order for anything to fossilize, it must be cut off from oxygen, for that is what is needed for decay to occur. Most often the material is buried under silt or mud rather quickly and that cuts off the oxygen supply. Fossilization is a very slow process that takes thousands of years to occur. What happens is the molecular structure of the antler, for instance, is slowly absorbing and being replaced by the mineral content of the surrounding mud or silt. What you have in the end is an exact "casting" of the original item. That is also why you will find different colors of fossils, for the color of the surrounding minerals is what determines and gives it it's unique coloring. I have found shark teeth for instance that go from black, which is very common, to grey, tan, rust and even some that are bluish green.
To me, it's a thrill to find a huge shark tooth that is perfectly intact, just as it was when it fell out of the sharks jaw millions of years ago. I'm just glad that I don't have to keep looking over my shoulder to see if I'm on the menu!
Yotebuster

_________________
May all your Bloodtrails be Vertical!
Back to top
View user's profile
DallanC
Site Admin
Site Admin


Joined: Jan 18, 2005
Posts: 3109
Location: Utah

PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2005 10:09 am    Post subject: Re: So where are the Antler Fossils? Reply with quote

That sounds really neat yotebuster. I havent heard of anyone diving for fossils before but it sounds like alot of fun.


-DallanC
Back to top
View user's profile Photo Gallery
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic   Printer Friendly Page    Forum Index » General
Page 1 of 1
All times are GMT - 7 Hours



Jump to:  


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Advertisements
 


Valid CSS! Valid HTML 4.01!
Click to check if this page is realy HTML 4.01 compliant for speed :)

All logos and trademarks in this site are property of HuntingNut.com.
The comments are property of their posters, all the rest © 2011 by HuntingNut.com
Interactive software released under GNU GPL, Code Credits, Privacy Policy

.: Upgraded to DragonFly 9.2 by Dizfunkshunal :.